forget the wheelchair: studio rotor's 'multimobby' makes fun airport transport for reduced mobility passengers

apr 16, 2017

forget the wheelchair: studio rotor’s ‘multimobby’ makes fun airport transport for reduced mobility passengers

 

in creating the multimobby, studio rotor had one question in mind-how do you transport airport passengers with reduced mobility to their gate – in a safe, comfortable and efficient way? nowadays, many airports use golf carts. but as the name says, these vehicles aren’t designed with airports in mind. so, when dutch manufacturer special mobility asked studio rotor for an electric transport vehicle design that fitted with the specific needs of airports and passengers, studio rotor set out to make airport transport fun with the multimobby.

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studio rotor has designed the vehicle with safety in mind. the driver seat is raised, to provide clear oversight of the surroundings. also, the high side doors ensure that passengers won’t put their arms outside. next to these physical barriers, the multimobby comes with a full sensor package to monitor obstacles and people outside the vehicle. even the speed is automatically reduced if necessary to prevent a collision.

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studio rotor claim that the multimobby drives like a tank – in a positive way. with its zero-turning radius, drivers can make 360 degree turns on the spot, and even easily enter an elevator

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the vehicle design can take up to 7 passengers, whereas current solutions can only take 5 with the same outer dimensions. through a smart vehicle layout of wheels, motors and batteries, it is possible to provide every passenger with enough space. the first vehicles are currently being tested at brussels airport and london heathrow and studio rotor note that the early feedback has been very positive.

beatrice murray-nag I designboom

apr 16, 2017



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