Author: Design Guru

Cruz Novillo: Logos

Cruz Novillo: Logos, published by Counter-Print. Although the focus is on Cruz Novillo’s logos, he found recognition in a varied career as an artist, sculptor, graphic designer, publisher, and illustrator. Born José María Cruz Novillo in Cuenca in 1936, Cruz Novillo first studied law before, in 1957, beginning a career as a cartoonist at Clarín Advertising in Madrid. Shortly after, he would begin to work in the field of industrial design at SEDI, years later promoting one of the first Spanish magazines that specialised in design, ‘Temas de Diseño’, whose editor was the architect Miguel Durán Lóriga. In 1963...

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HOW Logo Awards winners

Troll logo development, by Pacifica. Gund GUND is the oldest manufacturer of soft toys in America, and their logo, designed by Cynda Media Lab, pays homage to the company’s tradition of capturing facial expressions in their toys. Cochon Dingue Cochon Dingue (crazy pig) is a chain of French bistros in Québec, Canada. With vintage-French-poster–inspired typography and the bleu-blanc-rouge palette, the redesign by Québec-based LMG clearly shows the French roots while adding some contemporary fun. Full case study. Lela Buttery Lela Buttery not only has a unique last name, but she has a unique set of skills to match it:...

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Monthly Web Development Update 10/2017: CSS Grid, CAA Pitfalls, And Image Optimization

You know, we use ad-blockers as well. We gotta keep those servers running though. Did you know that we publish useful books and run friendly conferences — crafted for pros like yourself? E.g. our upcoming SmashingConf Barcelona, dedicated to smart front-end techniques and design patterns. Editor’s Note: Welcome to this month’s web development update. Anselm will summarize the most important things that happened in the web community over the past few weeks in one handy list for you. Enjoy! As web developers, we’re working in a very diverse environment: We have countless options to specialize in, but it’s impossible to keep up with everything. This week I read an article1 from a developer who realized that even though he has been building stuff for the web for over seven years, sometimes he just doesn’t understand what’s going on: “I’m slamming my keyboard in frustration as another mysterious error appears in my build script,” he writes. For him, writing JavaScript isn’t fun anymore. The tool chain got too complex, the workflows are built mainly for developer convenience, and many things that exist in the languages itself are reinvented in external libraries. Now when I look at the articles I collected for you this month, I can relate to the kind of frustration he’s feeling. Soon we won’t be able to use .dev domains anymore, HTTPS CAA checks don’t work with...

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Brief Encounters – RIBA

Veronica Simpson reports from a recent RIBA conference where some solutions to social and economic divisions were proposed by a hard-hitting cast list of speakers On a sweltering summer day about 300 assorted architects, architecture and urban design students immersed themselves in the air-conditioned comfort of the RIBA’s auditorium on Portland Street. It wasn’t just the A/C that was refreshing. The content of the event was fascinating and varied, a breath of fresh air in the rigour with which it examined the different ways architects can contribute to the evolution of cities – other than taking developers’ top...

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Don’t Let Your Brain Deceive You: Avoiding Bias In Your UX Feedback

You know that user feedback is crucial — after all, your users will decide whether your app succeeds or not — but how do you know whether users are being fair and objective in their feedback? We can tell you: They won’t be. All of your users will be giving you biased feedback. They can’t help it. When soliciting and listening to user feedback, you will inevitably run into bias on both sides of the coin: Biases will influence the people providing feedback, and your own biases will influence the way you receive that feedback. It’s important to be aware of this, especially when reviewing comments about your user experience (UX). Accurate and unbiased feedback is essential to developing the best possible version of your app1. Although you can’t erase your own biases (or those of your users), you can take steps to overcome common biases once you know what they are and how they might appear. The next time you ask your users for input, keep bias in mind and evaluate how you respond to users’ comments. Is your action (or inaction) driven by bias? Collecting And Analyzing Data Link When determining qualitative sample sizes in user research, researchers must know how to make the most of the data they collect. Your sample size won’t matter if you haven’t asked good questions and done thorough analysis. Read more...

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